Image of a happy lady
Online Self-Assessment Tool text size A- A+

Question #1: Do you leak urine?

Question #2: Do you wear protection (pads) because of urine loss?

Question #3: Do you leak when you cough, laugh, lift, sneeze, exercise, walk, stand up, or bend over?

Question #4: Do you leak on the way to the toilet?

Question #5: Are you bothered by your leakage?

Question #6: Have you stopped doing things as much because of urine leakage (for example, less socializing with friends and family or less frequent sex because of urine leakage?)

Question #7: If you had to live the rest of life with incontinence how would you feel?

Urine leakage can be associated with several types of incontinence or other conditions. Let's Continue.

Urine leakage that impact your quality of life is a sign of severe incontinence, possibly stress urinary incontinence. Let's Continue.

Urine leakage during normal physical activity or exercise is a sign of stress urinary incontinence. Let's Continue.

This could be a sign of urge incontinence or stres urinary incontinence. Let's Continue.

You answered yes to the last two questions. Which of the two happens more often, leakage during activity or leakage on the way to the toilet?

The strong, sudden need to urinate or inability to "hold" one's urination is more commonly associated with urgency incontinence or overactive bladder. Refer to our overactive bladder resources on this subject.

Urine leakage during normal physical activity or exercise is a sign of stress urinary incontinence.

When urine leakage becomes a bother or impacts your quality of life, it is time to seek medical advice.

When urine leakage becomes a bother or impacts your quality of life, it is time to seek medical advice.

When urine leakage becomes a bother or impacts your quality of life, it is time to seek medical advice.

Your answers indicate that you have one or more "triggers" associated with stress urinary incontinence. You can find more information and resources on our website. You should also see the advice of a medical professional. The website contains tools that can help you be more confident in discussing your condition with others and prepare for your appointment.

None of your answers would indicate that you exhibit any signs of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Healthy habits and lifestyle changes will help in reducing your risk for SUI. These include pelvic floor muscle exercises, stop smoking, and maintaining a health weight and general body health.

Thank you for taking time to answer these questions. Please view more information on this web site about things you can do to decrease your risk for SUI. Since one in three women will experience SUI at some point in their life, you will have a friend or family member that will be touched by SUI. Please take time to familiarize yourself with information so you can be a resource to others. It's Time to Talk About SUI!

©2017 Urology Care Foundation, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Request permission to duplicate or reprint content